Ketanji Brown Jackson Sworn in as First Black Girl on Supreme Courtroom: NPR


Judge Stephen G. Breyer (Retired) presided over the swearing-in ceremony before Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson in the West Conference Room at the Supreme Court Building. Her left hand rests on two bibles held by her husband, Dr. Patrick Jackson.

Fred Schilling, United States Supreme Court Collection


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Fred Schilling, United States Supreme Court Collection


Judge Stephen G. Breyer (Retired) presided over the swearing-in ceremony before Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson in the West Conference Room at the Supreme Court Building. Her left hand rests on two bibles held by her husband, Dr. Patrick Jackson.

Fred Schilling, United States Supreme Court Collection

Ketanji Brown Jackson sworn in as a judge of the 116th Supreme Court and the first Black woman to serve on the Supreme Court.

The ceremony introduced a multi-month process that essentially began in February, when President Biden, make a campaign promise to nominate the first black woman to the Supreme Court, announced Jackson, 51, as his choice to replace Justice Stephen Breyer, 83. Breyer – whom Jackson worked as a secretary after she graduated from Harvard Law School in 1996 – officially retired on Thursdaypaved the way for her to take the oath of office.


Chief Justice John G. Roberts looks on as Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson signs the Oath of Office in the Chamber of Judges at the Supreme Court.

Fred Schilling, United States Supreme Court Collection


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Chief Justice John G. Roberts looks on as Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson signs the Oath of Office in the Chamber of Judges at the Supreme Court.

Fred Schilling, United States Supreme Court Collection

“For too long, our government, our courts don’t look like America,” Biden said when he nominated her. “And I believe the time has come for us to have a court that reflects the full talent and greatness of our nation with a candidate of exceptional ability and we inspire all young people believe that they can one day serve their country to the highest degree.”

At noon service at the Supreme Court, Jackson, sworn twice: the constitutional oath, administered by Chief Justice John Roberts, and the judicial oath, administered by Breyer. A formal investment for Jackson will take place in the fall.

Jackson will face significant cases next term, including those involving affirmative action (which she can use herself), independent legislative theory, and religious freedom. .

She faces controversial Senate confirmation hearings

Jackson has been confirmed since April, when the Senate voted 53 to 47 on her nomination.

“It took 232 years and 115 prior appointments for a Black woman to be selected to serve on the Supreme Court of the United States, but we succeeded! We succeeded – all of us,” Jackson said in remarks at a White House event the day after the Senate vote.

Jackson also said, “I have dedicated my career to public service because I love this country and our Constitution and the rights that keep us free.

All 50 Senate Democrats, including two independents and three Republicans – Sens. Mitt Romney of Utah, Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska – voted in favor of Jackson’s confirmation. The poll was hailed as “historical moment“Democrats, although the confirmation process is rife with conflicts between the parties involved in the Jackson case judicial decisions in the past.

Jackson served eight years as a federal trial court judgegave more than 500 comments, and last June was confirmed for a seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia after also being nominated for that position by Biden.

Jackson is the first Supreme Court judge since Thurgood Marshall to have represented outraged crime defendants as a public defender. In addition, she has also served as vice chair of the United States Sentencing Commission, where she has established a reputation for creating consensus among its members.

Jackson participated in the ceremony by her husband and daughters

As Roberts and Breyer were sworn in, Jackson’s left hand rested on two stacked bibles held by her husband, Dr. Patrick Jackson. One is a family bible, the other is donated to the Supreme Court by Justice John Marshall Harlan. It is called the Harlan bible.

Harlan, known as a Major Dissident during his 34-year tenure on the court, was the only justice to vote no in 1896 in Plessy v. Fergusonwhich upholds the constitutionality of racial segregation under the doctrine of “separate but equal”.

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